Long take: First London training session

This Wednesday we welcomed a dozen of the adult participants in the programme to a prep session looking at the Long Take – examples, exercises, logistics.

We started with Lumieres: the Washerwomen, Repas du Bebe, Little Girl and a Cat, and Snowball Fight, all listed on Alasdair Satchel’s Long Take Youtube playlist here: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLknPDlZ9eUPDs8RWnYhdLrJhZt-cxNi5i

Amazing how much of the possibilities of cinema were discovered by these two pioneers.  Then we went out and made a bunch of ‘Lumiere minutes’: fixed camera, one minute long, to capture a ‘moment’ – the only difference being the addition of sound (and what a difference it makes..)

So here, a film by Michelle, Aileen and Jane.  Note how the frame is divided up into six units,  three on the top, three on the bottom, and the activity in the bottom right hand corner.  Just like the Washerwomen Lumiere film – and the moment captured being a halting performance of a piano piece, offscreen, slightly haunting..

And by Margaux and Mohammed, this slice of dog life, with skater backdrop:

OK, longer than a minute (it’s two), this vertical cross-section of the Royal Festival Hall, set to the accompaniment of Martin Creed’s singing lift installation, but which begins and ends with a couple silently dancing.

Ben from Film Club found this sample of Minute Lumieres, made by established film-makers – people like David Lynch:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MJpfrQy6i4&list=PL7A4469EB704E10C3

And this from Sight&Sound, on PT Anderson’s use of steadicam, mapped out s he does it:

http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/sight-sound-magazine/features/video-steadicam-progress-career-paul-thomas-anderson-five

And for people wondering how on earth to get students moving, with a camera, Ben found this:

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This entry was posted in Long Take - Plan séquence 2014 - 2015 and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Long take: First London training session

  1. Pingback: North London Obs January 2014 | Making is Learning

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